Re: Metaphors around Scheme Lassi Kortela 17 Jul 2019 15:20 UTC

>      From the above, the ultimate Scheme metaphor could be a technical
>     drawing of the gear system in a classic watch :D
>
> I like that.  As it happens, Prof. Sussman, coinventor of Scheme, is an
> accomplished watch repair person.  He repairs watch mechanisms as a hobby.

Bullseye! Couldn't be a happier coincidence :)

I wonder if he'd have the time to find some drawings for a good cause,
or recommend some place where we could find them?

Notice how much fun it is to design around metaphors that resemble the
thing itself? Most programming sites ignore this and that's why they are
not compelling. For example, the only thing python-related on the Python
site is the logo, and the language itself doesn't have anything
python-like about it. Since pythons are commonly feared or loathed, they
are in a sticky situation to improve things. Perhaps subtle allusions to
Monty Python would work, but jokes also wear out. It's a real challenge.

With Scheme we are in a lucky position. "Scheme" is a word for which we
can find many positive connotations outside computing. And Scheme itself
is organized around a scheme (recursion) so its nature contains
something of its own name. It would be awesome to design a whole website
around these metaphors. (We don't have to stick to these particular
metaphors, but I think we should use the general principle.)

Recursion is a particularly challenging metaphor. Amirouche's idea of
using computer-generated art is a good fit for it since that's often
recursive (extra points if the art evokes a "scheme" in some way). The
best possible outcome would be if we could organize the _information_
itself on the site in some kind of recursive way, but so that it remains
easy to navigate. Design can be a very intellectually challenging field.

By the way, many/most well-known commercial logos contain a hidden
metaphor. Here are some examples:
<https://digitalsynopsis.com/design/famous-brand-logos-hidden-meanings/>.