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Syntax extensions Jakub T. Jankiewicz (05 Mar 2021 20:44 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (06 Mar 2021 09:10 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Amirouche Boubekki (06 Mar 2021 09:23 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Amirouche Boubekki (06 Mar 2021 09:47 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Jakub T. Jankiewicz (06 Mar 2021 14:26 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (06 Mar 2021 14:43 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Jakub T. Jankiewicz (06 Mar 2021 16:03 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (06 Mar 2021 16:20 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (07 Mar 2021 22:08 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Jakub T. Jankiewicz (08 Mar 2021 07:47 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (08 Mar 2021 08:25 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions John Cowan (15 Mar 2021 02:54 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Jakub T. Jankiewicz (15 Mar 2021 08:01 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (15 Mar 2021 15:53 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Adam Nelson (16 Mar 2021 12:07 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (16 Mar 2021 12:50 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Jakub T. Jankiewicz (16 Mar 2021 16:37 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (16 Mar 2021 17:12 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Jakub T. Jankiewicz (16 Mar 2021 17:31 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (16 Mar 2021 19:53 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions John Cowan (18 Mar 2021 20:10 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (18 Mar 2021 21:36 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions John Cowan (19 Mar 2021 04:18 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (19 Mar 2021 06:43 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Jakub T. Jankiewicz (19 Mar 2021 08:04 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (19 Mar 2021 08:12 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (15 Mar 2021 15:42 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions John Cowan (18 Mar 2021 00:38 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (18 Mar 2021 06:36 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Jakub T. Jankiewicz (20 Aug 2021 21:03 UTC)
Re: Syntax extensions Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen (20 Aug 2021 21:18 UTC)

Re: Syntax extensions Amirouche Boubekki 06 Mar 2021 09:23 UTC

Le sam. 6 mars 2021 à 10:10, Marc Nieper-Wißkirchen
<xxxxxx@nieper-wisskirchen.de> a écrit :
>
> It's not at all clear to me how the special forms you suggest fit into the RnRS scheme model of reading, expanding, and executing a program (with libraries).
>
> Can you explain the semantics in detail? Say for a file containing "specials" like `#:` that is read through the `read` procedure. When is `set-special!` evaluated and how and when do the implied reader extensions apply?
>

If a program.scm contains `set-special!` and use that reader extension
defined in the very same file, how does it work or how can it be
implemented?

> -- Marc
>
> Am Fr., 5. März 2021 um 21:44 Uhr schrieb Jakub T. Jankiewicz <xxxxxx@onet.pl>:
>>
>> Hi,
>>
>> I plan to work on new SRFI I would know what you think about my idea.
>> I've already implemented first idea in my Scheme based lisp called LIPS
>> written in JavaScript.
>>
>> The feature I want to work on is called syntax extensions is the way to add
>> new syntax like build in , ' ` ,@ that work exactly the same, that would
>> allow users to modify the parser/reader. The feature work similar to
>> compiler extensions in Common Lisp. You define the mapping - string of one or
>> more characters and symbol for a function or macro that will be called when
>> parser/reader will read the token with S-Expression that immediately follow
>> the token.
>>
>> Example from my own code:
>>
>> (set-special! "#:" 'gensym-interal)
>>
>> (define (gensym-interal symbol)
>>   "(gensym-interal symbol)
>>
>>    Parser extension that create new quoted named gensym."
>>   `(quote ,(gensym symbol)))
>>
>> If gensym function is defined (most Scheme implementation support this or
>> other similar function together with lisp macros).
>>
>> If you execute #:foo it will return unique gensym symbol.
>>
>> With this you can implement lot of features that are already in R7RS spec or
>> in other SRFI documents. The syntax can be simplified to have single
>> expression that define prefix and function. But I think this is better
>> because you have normal function that can also be used elsewhere not only in
>> parser.
>>
>> Another example is alias for quotation:
>>
>> (set-special! "’" 'quote)
>>
>> and this will allow to run every example in R7RS pdf that have different
>> quote character that throw syntax error when copy pasting.
>>
>> Another use is to implement SRFI-10, vectors, byte vectors or
>> All types of Typed vectors that I've found in this document:
>>
>> https://small.r7rs.org/wiki/NumericVectorsCowan/17/
>>
>> In my implementation I also have complementary feature that all to add
>> string representation for objects. They are JavaScript objects so I just check
>> the type.
>>
>> Example:
>>
>> (set-repr! Uint8Array (lambda (x)
>>                         (string-append "#u8" (repr (u8vector->list x)))))
>>
>> This is code based on my standard library (in my code I have one big macro
>> that define all different types from Numeric vectors by Cowan) that add
>> support for printing byte vectors as "#u8(...)" which make the data type
>> transparent to read and write.
>>
>> My implementation is kind of special because it's interpreter created in
>> other runtime dynamic language (JavaScript). But this can be extended into
>> records or different generic data types that can be easily identify by
>> Scheme system.
>>
>> Why this is useful (if you don't think that it's useful already).
>> It's because if this type of extensions are supported by the language (in
>> form of SRFI) library can create missing syntax that are in other SRFI or
>> future versions of Scheme. It can be useful to add new syntax. Of course
>> the same as with macros or even more you should use those only when
>> necessary, that would make the code simpler and easier to read.
>>
>> Those can be two different SRFI, the second (set-repr!) can be defined as a
>> way to define representation for records that are new data type defined by
>> R7RS, but can be left for implementers to add different objects
>> that the Scheme system allow users to define, basic support can be for
>> records.
>>
>> With records one can define their own list type (like example from R7RS
>> document)
>>
>> (define-record-type <pare>
>>   (kons x y)
>>   pare?
>>   (x kar set-kar!)
>>   (y kdr))
>>
>> (set-special! "<>" 'k-list)
>>
>> (define (k-list rest)
>>   (fold-left kons nil rest))
>>
>>
>> (define (type->string x)
>>   (if (pare? x)
>>       (pare->string x)
>>       (let ((p (open-output-string)))
>>         (write x p)
>>         (get-output-string p))))
>>
>> (define (pare->string pare)
>>    (if (pare? pare)
>>        (string-append "<>(" (pare->join pare) ")")
>>        (type->string x)))
>>
>>
>> (define (pare->join pare)
>>    (if (pare? pare)
>>       (string-append (type->string (kar pare))
>>                      (if (pare? (kdr pare)) " " "")
>>                      (pare->join (kdr pare)))
>>       ""))
>>
>>
>> Usage:
>>
>> (print (pare->string (kons 1 (kons 2 nil))))
>> (print (pare->string <>(1 2 3 4)))
>>
>> and if set-repr! support records (in my implementation as I've said it only
>> support JavaScript instances, but this is something I can easily add)
>> the only thing that left is that you can execute this:
>>
>> (set-repr! <pare> pare->string)
>>
>> and you have fully working transparent new data type.
>>
>> Unfortunately you can't add support for <1 2 3> as representation and to make
>> this align better with other SRFI we can suggest users to use # prefix for
>> user data types, but I think that this should be only suggestion. User should
>> be allowed to use any syntax he want.
>>
>> I want to know what you think about those proposals. I've already talk with
>> Arthur A. Gleckler and he suggested that I should mention this here.
>>
>> --
>> Jakub T. Jankiewicz, Web Developer
>> https://jcubic.pl/me
>>

--
Amirouche ~ https://hyper.dev